739: Helen M Farrell: What Is Depression?

Depression is the leading cause of disability in the world; in the United States, close to ten per cent of adults struggle with the disease. But because it’s a mental illness, it can be a lot harder to understand than, say, high cholesterol. Helen M Farrell examines the symptoms and treatments of depression and gives some tips for how you might help a friend who is suffering. Read More

NHS 1948 — 2018 Thank You For Seventy Years Of Service

#ThankYouNHS70
#ThankYouNHS70

Please Join me in thanking the wonderful people who work within the UK’s National Health Service. The NHS marks its 70th Anniversary today: 5th July 1948 — 5th July 2018. Please add your personal thanks, by commenting here, sharing this post, and using the hashtag: #ThankYouNHS70.

Joelle Rabow Maletis: The Psychology Of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Trauma is any negative life event in which the brain perceives a real sense of danger, horror, and helplessness. PTSD occurs when people are directly exposed to, repeatedly exposed to, or witness horrific events, such as death, abuse, domestic violence, or war. During these events, the body’s stress response kicks into overdrive. Studies show that women are more likely to experience sexual abuse as children, whereas men are more likely to experience physical assault or witness death.

A person’s PTSD symptoms may prove indiscernible to others. When people are reliving their trauma, they sometimes stare off into space as if they are watching a movie.

You Can Smell When Someone’s Sick—Here’s How

The curious case of a woman who can smell Parkinson’s reminds us our noses are our first defense against illness.

Joy Milne (right) was able to correctly identify people with Parkinson’s disease based solely on their smell.

I’m sick, and I don’t smell right. I don’t mean that my nose isn’t working—though this cold has me stuffed up. Instead, my own body odor seems somehow different, sour and unfamiliar.

I’m far from the first person to notice this nasty side effect. Scientists have found that dozens of illnesses have a particular smell: Diabetes can make your urine smell like rotten apples, and typhoid turns body odor into the smell of baked bread.