NHS 1948 — 2018 Thank You For Seventy Years Of Service

#ThankYouNHS70
#ThankYouNHS70

Please Join me in thanking the wonderful people who work within the UK’s National Health Service. The NHS marks its 70th Anniversary today: 5th July 1948 — 5th July 2018. Please add your personal thanks, by commenting here, sharing this post, and using the hashtag: #ThankYouNHS70. Read More

Joelle Rabow Maletis: The Psychology Of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Trauma is any negative life event in which the brain perceives a real sense of danger, horror, and helplessness. PTSD occurs when people are directly exposed to, repeatedly exposed to, or witness horrific events, such as death, abuse, domestic violence, or war. During these events, the body’s stress response kicks into overdrive. Studies show that women are more likely to experience sexual abuse as children, whereas men are more likely to experience physical assault or witness death.

A person’s PTSD symptoms may prove indiscernible to others. When people are reliving their trauma, they sometimes stare off into space as if they are watching a movie.

Read More

You Can Smell When Someone’s Sick—Here’s How

The curious case of a woman who can smell Parkinson’s reminds us our noses are our first defense against illness.

Joy Milne (right) was able to correctly identify people with Parkinson’s disease based solely on their smell.

I’m sick, and I don’t smell right. I don’t mean that my nose isn’t working—though this cold has me stuffed up. Instead, my own body odor seems somehow different, sour and unfamiliar.

I’m far from the first person to notice this nasty side effect. Scientists have found that dozens of illnesses have a particular smell: Diabetes can make your urine smell like rotten apples, and typhoid turns body odor into the smell of baked bread.

Read More

The New Hippocratic Oath: The Physician’s Pledge

The Hippocratic oath is a 2,500-year-old pledge doctors take outlining the professional duties and ethical principles the profession holds sacred. The first modern version of the Hippocratic oath was adopted in 1948. The version released in November 2017, by the World Medical Association in Chicago took two years to finalise and is the ancient text’s first ever major update. A new name was proposed as well: “The Physician’s Pledge.”

The Physician’s Pledge

As a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;
The health and well-being of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will respect the autonomy and dignity of my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
I will practise my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;
I will foster the honour and noble traditions of the medical profession;
I will give to my teachers, colleagues, and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;
I will share my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;
I will attend to my own health, well-being, and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;
I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
I make these promises solemnly, freely, and upon my honour.

Read More