The New Hippocratic Oath: The Physician’s Pledge

The Hippocratic oath is a 2,500-year-old pledge doctors take outlining the professional duties and ethical principles the profession holds sacred. The first modern version of the Hippocratic oath was adopted in 1948. The version released in November 2017, by the World Medical Association in Chicago took two years to finalise and is the ancient text’s first ever major update. A new name was proposed as well: “The Physician’s Pledge.”

The Physician’s Pledge

As a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;
The health and well-being of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will respect the autonomy and dignity of my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
I will practise my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;
I will foster the honour and noble traditions of the medical profession;
I will give to my teachers, colleagues, and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;
I will share my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;
I will attend to my own health, well-being, and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;
I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
I make these promises solemnly, freely, and upon my honour.

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind By Barbara Lipska

In her new book, The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies.

One spring morning in 2015, Barbara Lipska got up as usual, dyed her hair and went for a jog in her suburban Virginia neighbourhood.

But when she returned from a much longer than expected run, her husband Mirek was completely taken aback.

In Memory Of Joyce Riley: An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend

Joyce Ann Riley: July 31, 1948 – June 25, 2017
An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend.

Joyce Ann Riley was welcomed into the world on July 31, 1948. Fittingly, she was born just outside Arkansas City, Kansas on the border with Oklahoma, in the heart of the United States. Eventually, Joyce would capture the hearts of millions of people around the world, including my own, becoming a trusted friend and mentor.

Her father owned a pharmacy while her mother was a stay-at-home mum. Joyce was the eldest of three children. One of her passions, as well as being on The Power Hour was quilting, a talent, and pleasure inherited from her mother.

Good Health Is Our Natural State

Today is February 18, 2015, and another anniversary of my freedom from the toxic cocktail of prescription medication, which was threatening to destroy my life, before the start of My Serrapeptase Adventure, way back in January 2006. The speed with which I was able to leave the medications behind is still one of the most remarkable things about my recovery, for people learning about it for the first time, and for everyone who witnessed it first hand, alike.

I am often asked two questions, one about how I felt in 2006, and one about how I think, and feel now. The first question is about whether or not I was surprised, or nervous, at the time, less than two months after starting to take Serrapeptase specifically, and more generally, a natural approach to improving and maintaining my health.

Regenerating Hope: TEDGlobal 2013 With Dr Siddharthan Chandran

Regenerative neurologist, Dr Siddharthan Chandran, of  The Euan MacDonald Centre, at the University of Edinburgh, asks whether we can repair the damaged brain. Here’s the problem: Humanity is facing an epidemic of fast-progressing, devastating neurological disease such as Alzheimer’s, motor neuron disease, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis and Huntington’s. Collectively, this is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. Over 35 million people are affected, and the global annual cost is $700 billion and rising — greater than 1% of global GDP.

Chandran shows two clips of one of his patients, John, who, speaking through a respirator, explains that difficulty breathing, in 2011, led to the diagnosis of motor neuron disease.