Why Your Doctor’s Advice To Take All Your Antibiotics May Be Wrong

You’ve heard it many times before from your doctor: If you’re taking antibiotics, don’t stop taking them until the pill vial is empty, even if you feel better.

The rationale behind this commandment has always been that stopping treatment too soon would fuel the development of antibiotic resistance — the ability of bugs to evade these drugs. Information campaigns aimed at getting the public to take antibiotics properly have been driving home this message for decades.

But the warning, a growing number of experts say, is misguided and may actually be exacerbating antibiotic resistance.

The reasoning is simple: Exposure to antibiotics is what drives bacteria to develop resistance.

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E-NABLE: Giving The World A Helping Hand

What started as a design for a prosthetic hand created for one, has grown into a global movement of philanthropic individuals who have delivered free 3D printed hands and arms to thousands in over 40 countries.

This is the story of the evolution and the power of sharing ideas.

Regular readers will already know of my ongoing support for the e-NABLE project. I hope that sharing their back-story, will encourage you to join me in support of this simple, but transformational idea.

For more information, please visit the e-NABLE website, and get involved.

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Sarah Henderson: Our Message Has Been Heard

27 Jan 2017 — Some of you will have seen this petition featured on BBC breakfast and heard me on BBC5 live this morning.

Every single one of your signatures helped make this happen. Each of you helped bring this to the attention of the media so we can ask publicly for change. Without your support I would never have had the opportunity, or the courage, to bring this to the BBC. I am a small voice, but together we have been heard.

This does not end here for me – I will continue to work with Zoë and the charity Saying Goodbye to help action change and get the recognition our children deserve with an optional certificate and record for all loss, no matter the gestation.

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Sarah Henderson: Allow Registered Birth Certificates For Children Born From 20 Weeks

Rowan, my daughter, was stillborn at 23 weeks and 4 days (6 months). I was in labour for 7 hours before she arrived naturally but she is legally described as a miscarriage and will never have a birth certificate.

This ruling needs to be overhauled allowing these children’s births to be registered.

All babies should be recognised and child loss at any stage is no less traumatic.

Due to babies now being viable before 24 weeks I would like the term stillbirth to be used from 20 weeks and birth certificates issued.

I lost Rowan in April 2015 and it’s so important to me that she should have a birth certificate so she is registered as a member of our family for future generations.

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Kevin B. Jones: Why Curiosity Is The Key To Science And Medicine

Science is a learning process that involves experimentation, failure and revision — and the science of medicine is no exception. Cancer researcher Kevin B. Jones faces the deep unknowns about surgery and medical care with a simple answer: honesty. In a thoughtful talk about the nature of knowledge, Jones shows how science is at its best when scientists humbly admit what they do not yet understand.

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Jennifer Brea: What Happens When You Have A Disease Doctors Can’t Diagnose?

Five years ago, TED Fellow Jennifer Brea became progressively ill with myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome, a debilitating illness that severely impairs normal activities and on bad days makes even the rustling of bed sheets unbearable. In this poignant talk, Brea describes the obstacles she’s encountered in seeking treatment for her condition, whose root causes and physical effects we don’t fully understand, as well as her mission to document through film the lives of patients that medicine struggles to treat.

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What Would Happen If You Didn’t Sleep?

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep.

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How Stress Can Make You Sick

Our hard-wired stress response is designed to gives us the quick burst of heightened alertness and energy needed to perform our best. But stress isn’t all good. When activated too long or too often, stress can damage virtually every part of our body. Sharon Horesh Bergquist gives us a look at what goes on inside our body when we are chronically stressed.

Thanks to TED.

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9 Anti-Cancer Foods You Cannot Ignore

With modern lifestyles, people are exposed to multiple carcinogenic agents on a daily basis. It is hence no wonder that cancer rates are soaring. To keep far away from this terrifying disease, below is a list of cancer foods that cannot be ignored.

Flavonoid-Rich Berries

These berries include currants, cherries, cranberries, hawthorn berries, blueberries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries. As powerful antioxidants, flavonoids can be more potent than traditional antioxidants like vitamin C and E, beta-carotene, selenium and zinc. And antioxidants are well-known to be crucial in the prevention of cancer.

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To ‘Standardise’, Or Not To ‘Standardize’, That Is The Question…

Most of you will not be surprised to know that, by instinct, and thanks to good teaching, I usually choose to write, and to spell, in British English. For those of you who enjoy writing, and especially for those who are avid readers. I have a two-part question.

When I write an article, which includes a quotation from an American source, should I ‘standardise’ the American spelling, to match British spelling, or leave the quotation unchanged? Secondly, regardless of which you believe to be correct, I would also like to ask, which do you prefer — to ‘standardise’, or not to ‘standardize’, that is the question…

Thank you for taking the time to think about this with me. Read More “To ‘Standardise’, Or Not To ‘Standardize’, That Is The Question…”