You Can Smell When Someone’s Sick—Here’s How

The curious case of a woman who can smell Parkinson’s reminds us our noses are our first defense against illness.

Joy Milne (right) was able to correctly identify people with Parkinson’s disease based solely on their smell.

I’m sick, and I don’t smell right. I don’t mean that my nose isn’t working—though this cold has me stuffed up. Instead, my own body odor seems somehow different, sour and unfamiliar.

I’m far from the first person to notice this nasty side effect. Scientists have found that dozens of illnesses have a particular smell: Diabetes can make your urine smell like rotten apples, and typhoid turns body odor into the smell of baked bread.

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The New Hippocratic Oath: The Physician’s Pledge

The Hippocratic oath is a 2,500-year-old pledge doctors take outlining the professional duties and ethical principles the profession holds sacred. The first modern version of the Hippocratic oath was adopted in 1948. The version released in November 2017, by the World Medical Association in Chicago took two years to finalise and is the ancient text’s first ever major update. A new name was proposed as well: “The Physician’s Pledge.”

The Physician’s Pledge

As a member of the medical profession:

I solemnly pledge to dedicate my life to the service of humanity;
The health and well-being of my patient will be my first consideration;
I will respect the autonomy and dignity of my patient;
I will maintain the utmost respect for human life;
I will not permit considerations of age, disease or disability, creed, ethnic origin, gender, nationality, political affiliation, race, sexual orientation, social standing or any other factor to intervene between my duty and my patient;
I will respect the secrets that are confided in me, even after the patient has died;
I will practise my profession with conscience and dignity and in accordance with good medical practice;
I will foster the honour and noble traditions of the medical profession;
I will give to my teachers, colleagues, and students the respect and gratitude that is their due;
I will share my medical knowledge for the benefit of the patient and the advancement of healthcare;
I will attend to my own health, well-being, and abilities in order to provide care of the highest standard;
I will not use my medical knowledge to violate human rights and civil liberties, even under threat;
I make these promises solemnly, freely, and upon my honour.

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CDC Is A Vaccine Company, Owns 56 Vaccines — A Grave Conflict Of Interest

Two recent events have forced a glaring spotlight on the $30 billion a year vaccine industry: First, President Donald Trump announced a plan to establish a commission chaired by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (RFK) to investigate vaccine safety and scientific integrity. The second, again featuring RFK, is when he and actor Robert De Niro announced a $100,000 reward to any scientist (or anyone else) who could conclusively prove the safety of mercury (in the form thimerosal) in vaccines.

Both events have unleashed a veritable storm of fury from the mainstream media, many of whom label both De Niro and RFK “vaccine skeptics” or “anti-vaccine,” despite the men’s repeated objections and insistence that they are pro-vaccine and dutifully had all their children vaccinated.

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App-Controlled Medical Implant Could Replace Addictive Opioids By Jamming Pain Signals To The Brain

  • App-controlled medical implant could replace addictive opioids by jamming pain signals to the brain – but it will cost patients thousands.
  • Spinal cord stimulators are implanted along the spine and use electrical impulses to interfere with pain signals sent to the brain from parts of the body.
  • The technology has been around since the 1970s, but recent developments are making the devices far more user-friendly.
  • Studies have shown that patients with chronic pain are able to wean themselves off of prescription opioids after getting spinal cord stimulator systems implanted.

A tiny, surgically-implanted device for treating pain may offer an alternative to addictive opioids for many patients.

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Why Mental Illness Can Fuel Physical Disease

For people who suffer from depression or anxiety, being diagnosed with a physical health condition on top of a mental health issue can feel like the worst kind of bad luck. But recent research suggests that this type of dual diagnosis is more than just an unfortunate coincidence. Scientists are learning that seemingly unrelated psychological and physical issues may actually be closely connected.

Doctors once thought that the link between mental and physical health problems was purely behavioral. Depressed people are less likely to take their medications or practice healthy habits, for instance, so they get sicker.

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In Memory Of Joyce Riley: An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend

Joyce Ann Riley: July 31, 1948 – June 25, 2017
An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend.

Joyce Ann Riley was welcomed into the world on July 31, 1948. Fittingly, she was born just outside Arkansas City, Kansas on the border with Oklahoma, in the heart of the United States. Eventually, Joyce would capture the hearts of millions of people around the world, including my own, becoming a trusted friend and mentor.

Her father owned a pharmacy while her mother was a stay-at-home mum. Joyce was the eldest of three children. One of her passions, as well as being on The Power Hour was quilting, a talent and pleasure inherited from her mother. Read More

‘Ground-Breaking’ Films Released To Encourage A ‘National Conversation’ On Mental Health

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry released ten films as part of the Heads Together mental health campaign. The films feature people from all walks of life talking, often with the person that they first opened up to, about the life changing conversation that helped them cope with their mental health problems – from anxiety, alcoholism and depression through to loneliness, trauma and bereavement.

The first series for films, published on the Heads Together YouTube page and website, includes: two mums of young children; musician Stephen Manderson (Professor Green) and Cricketer Freddie Flintoff; a journalist and her friend; comedian Ruby Wax and her husband Ed; two paramedics based in Blackpool; model Adwoa Aboah with her mum; a blogger and her mum; and writer Alastair Campbell talking with his partner, Fiona.

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Dr Tetyana Obukhanych: An Open Letter to Legislators Currently Considering Vaccine Legislation

Vaccination, at its core, is neither a safe nor effective method of disease prevention.

Dr Tetyana Obukhanych

Do unvaccinated children pose a higher threat to the public than the vaccinated?

It is often stated that those who choose not to vaccinate their children for reasons of conscience endanger the rest of the public, and this is the rationale behind most of the legislation to end vaccine exemptions currently being considered by federal and state legislators country-wide.  You should be aware that the nature of protection afforded by many modern vaccines – and that includes most of the vaccines recommended by the CDC for children – is not consistent with such a statement. 

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Four In Five Hospitals ‘Not Safe Enough’ In England

Safety at four in five hospital trusts in England is not good enough, inspectors say.

Staffing and overcrowding are major concerns – and they warned that patients are at risk as hospitals faced unprecedented pressures.

The Care Quality Commission review also highlighted delays getting tests and treatments and poor care of life-threatening conditions such as sepsis.

Ministers said the findings should be used to root out poor practices.

But inspectors warned some of the problems were beyond the control of hospitals because of rising demands being placed on them.

10 charts that show why the NHS is in trouble
The review of all 136 hospital trusts in the country found 11% were rated as inadequate on safety and 70% required improvement.

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Why Your Doctor’s Advice To Take All Your Antibiotics May Be Wrong

You’ve heard it many times before from your doctor: If you’re taking antibiotics, don’t stop taking them until the pill vial is empty, even if you feel better.

The rationale behind this commandment has always been that stopping treatment too soon would fuel the development of antibiotic resistance — the ability of bugs to evade these drugs. Information campaigns aimed at getting the public to take antibiotics properly have been driving home this message for decades.

But the warning, a growing number of experts say, is misguided and may actually be exacerbating antibiotic resistance.

The reasoning is simple: Exposure to antibiotics is what drives bacteria to develop resistance.

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