Four In Five Hospitals ‘Not Safe Enough’ In England

Safety at four in five hospital trusts in England is not good enough, inspectors say.

Staffing and overcrowding are major concerns – and they warned that patients are at risk as hospitals faced unprecedented pressures.

The Care Quality Commission review also highlighted delays getting tests and treatments and poor care of life-threatening conditions such as sepsis.

Ministers said the findings should be used to root out poor practices.

But inspectors warned some of the problems were beyond the control of hospitals because of rising demands being placed on them.

10 charts that show why the NHS is in trouble
The review of all 136 hospital trusts in the country found 11% were rated as inadequate on safety and 70% required improvement.

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Receptionists ‘Put People Off Seeing Doctor’

Receptionists quizzing patients about why they need to see their GP could be putting some sick people off visiting their surgery, a survey suggests.

Of almost 2,000 adults questioned for Cancer Research UK, four in 10 said they disliked having to discuss their ills with office staff in order to get an appointment.

Many were worried about making a fuss.

Experts say patients must be forceful and not take no for an answer if they have symptoms that need investigating.

The government says it is funding training to help receptionists learn how to be sensitive to patients’ needs.

Probing Questions

Receptionists are the first point of contact in primary care and it is their job to decide which patients should see the GP and how urgently.

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Student Doctor Numbers To Rise By 25%

The number of medical school places will increase by 25% from 2018 under plans to make England “self-sufficient” in training doctors.

The government’s plan will see an expansion in training places from 6,000 to 7,500 a year.

Ministers believe increasing the number of home-grown doctors will be essential given the ageing population.

There is also concern it will become more difficult to recruit doctors trained abroad in the future.

About a quarter of the medical workforce is trained outside the UK, but the impact of Brexit and a global shortage of doctors could make it harder to recruit so many in the future.

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Could Turmeric Really Boost Your Health?

Bold health claims have been made for the power of turmeric. Is there anything in them, asks Michael Mosley.

Turmeric is a spice which in its raw form looks a bit like ginger root, but when it’s ground down you get a distinctive yellowy orange powder that’s very popular in South Asian cuisine. Until recently the place you would most likely encounter turmeric would be in chicken tikka masala, one of Britain’s most popular dishes.

These days, thanks to claims that it can improve everything from allergies to depression, it’s become incredibly trendy, not just cooked and sprinkled on food but added to drinks like tea.

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Doctor Urges Compulsory Mediation In Patient Care Rows

The NHS could save millions of pounds if families and doctors were offered mediation when they disagreed on a treatment, a leading consultant said.

Dr Chris Danbury, an anaesthetist at Reading’s Royal Berkshire Hospital, said it should be made a legal requirement in England and Wales.

Examples of when mediation should be used include disagreements in whether to turn off life support, he said.

This would avoid a case going to the Court of Protection.

Another instance where mediation could be used was when a patient who is mentally competent did not want to accept a treatment they medically needed.

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Around The Clock Care For Dying ‘Not Good Enough’

A national review of end-of-life care has found most hospitals are failing to provide face-to-face palliative care specialists around the clock.

The review shows only 16 of 142 hospital sites in England offer specialists on site 24/7.

NHS experts acknowledge steady improvements in the last two years, but warn there is still work to do.

It’s the first review since the controversial Liverpool Care Pathway was scrapped.

‘Major Deficiencies’

The Liverpool Care Pathway was phased out amid criticisms it had been misused as a tick-box exercise, leaving some patients without food and water.

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Cancer Is not Just ‘Bad Luck’ But Down To Environment, Study Suggests

Cancer is overwhelmingly a result of environmental factors and not largely down to bad luck, a study suggests.

Earlier this year, researchers sparked a debate after suggesting two-thirds of cancer types were down to luck rather than factors such as smoking.

The new study, in the journal Nature, used four approaches to conclude only 10-30% of cancers were down to the way the body naturally functions or “luck”.

Experts said the analysis was “pretty convincing”.

Cancer is caused by one of the body’s own stem cells going rogue and dividing out of control.

That can be caused either by intrinsic factors that are part of the innate way the body operates, such as the risk of mutations occurring every time a cell divides, or extrinsic factors such as smoking, UV radiation and many others that have not been identified.

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Mental Health Equality Call Gets High Profile Backing

A campaign calling for an increase in funding for mental health services in England has been launched.

Over 200 celebrities have backed the push for mental health to be treated as seriously as other illnesses.

It was launched by former mental health minister Norman Lamb, Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell and former Labour spin doctor Alastair Campbell.

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt said treatment had made “great strides” but more could be done to improve services.

The government increased overall mental health funding to £11.7bn in 2014/15.

But Mr Lamb said people with mental ill health “don’t get the same right to access treatment on a timely basis that everyone else gets”.

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NHS And Care Sector: Safety A ‘Big Concern’ In England

Safety across the NHS and care sectors in England is a “significant concern”, with particular problems in hospitals, inspectors are warning.

The Care Quality Commission found three-quarters of the 79 hospital trusts visited under its new inspection regime so far had safety problems.

Over 40% of care and nursing homes and home care services and one in three GP services also had problems with safety.

Lack of staff – in terms of skills and numbers – was identified as a major issue.

The way medicines were managed and how mistakes were investigated and learnt from were also highlighted.

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‘Transmittable Alzheimer’s’ Concept Raised

People may be able to contract Alzheimer’s during certain medical procedures in the same way as the brain disease CJD, say researchers.

Contaminated surgical instruments or injections, such as human growth hormone, may pose a rare but potential risk, they speculate in Nature.

The theoretical hunch comes from post-mortem brain studies in eight patients.

The UK experts stress that their findings are inconclusive and do not mean Alzheimer’s is infectious.

People cannot catch Alzheimer’s from coming into contact with other people with the condition.

Brain Changes

Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that is more common with increasing age.

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