The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind By Barbara Lipska

In her new book, The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies.

One spring morning in 2015, Barbara Lipska got up as usual, dyed her hair and went for a jog in her suburban Virginia neighbourhood.

But when she returned from a much longer than expected run, her husband Mirek was completely taken aback.

“I was lost in my own neighbourhood,” Lipska says. “The hair dye that I put in my hair that morning dripped down my neck. I looked like a monster when I came back home.”

Although she now lucidly recalls that moment, at the time she was oblivious to her unusual appearance and behaviour.

Lipska studies the neuroscience of mental illness and brain development at the National Institute of Mental Health. In her work she’s examined the molecular structure of the brains of people who were so afflicted with schizophrenia or other disorders that they took their own lives.

And for two months in 2015, she developed similar symptoms of dementia and schizophrenia — only to learn they were the effects of cancerous tumours, growing in her brain.

With thanks to NPR for the interview.

Anna Altman: Life With Migraines

Headaches are one of the most common symptoms that patients report to their doctors, but their causes and manifestations vary so much that a diagnosis does little to help.

From the Greek hemi (“half”) and kranion (“skull”), migraine is associated with severe, throbbing, unilateral pain; an aversion to light and sound; and nausea and vomiting, all of which is aggravated by movement. But migraine may include or trigger many other symptoms. An attack may be announced by sudden exhaustion, food cravings, a foul mood, or what is called an aura, a neurological phenomenon that disrupts a migraineur’s vision with silvery squiggles and zigzags.

For some, a migraine might include extreme sensitivity to touch, partial blindness, vertigo, or the inability to speak. There are also vestibular migraines – attacks associated primarily with dizziness – and abdominal migraines, when pain is instead felt in the stomach. Both of these may occur without head pain and can be bewildering to patients seeking a diagnosis. After an attack – which may last up to four days – many migraineurs suffer from a “post-drome”, when they might feel listless, agitated, or depressed.

Although migraine symptoms have been described since antiquity, doctors still struggle to understand their cause. For much of the early 20th century, migraine was thought to be a vascular condition, something that could be treated by restricting blood vessels. Now, most neurologists argue that migraine is a disorder of the trigeminal nerve system, where overactive cells in the face and head respond to benign input (light, sound, smell) by releasing chemicals that transmit pain. But doctors still can’t offer reliable relief.

The best treatment available is prevention, so my doctor tells me about possible triggers – stress, menstruation, sleeping too much, sleeping too little. Beyond that, treatment is a process of trial and error.

Anna Altman
The Guardian: Long Reads

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The Health-Care Survivor’s Comment

I have suffered from migraines since childhood, and this is the best general description of migraines I have ever found. Although this article was not written for the benefit of the medical profession, I am sure that many nurses and clinicians of all kinds could learn something from Altman’s experience.

In Memory Of Joyce Riley: An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend

Joyce Ann Riley: July 31, 1948 – June 25, 2017
An Inspirational Advocate, Broadcaster, And Friend.

Joyce Ann Riley was welcomed into the world on July 31, 1948. Fittingly, she was born just outside Arkansas City, Kansas on the border with Oklahoma, in the heart of the United States. Eventually, Joyce would capture the hearts of millions of people around the world, including my own, becoming a trusted friend and mentor.

Her father owned a pharmacy while her mother was a stay-at-home mum. Joyce was the eldest of three children. One of her passions, as well as being on The Power Hour was quilting, a talent and pleasure inherited from her mother. The tragedy of her family came when one of her younger brothers died unexpectedly. Undoubtedly, her father’s involvement in the medical community influenced her career decisions.

As a young woman, Joyce was determined to make some mark in the world. The tenacity we grew to love brought her all the way to the University of Kansas. Her passion for helping those who could not always help themselves was embedded in her makeup. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in nursing, leading to a full range of nursing duties in the private sector.

Her expertise and willingness to serve landed her in the Air Force, where she attained the rank of captain. Joyce became a flight nurse aboard C-130 missions in support of Operation Desert Storm. The kinship she felt with those in uniform is a precious part of her legacy. The experimentation she endured, and witnessed, changed Joyce forever. ‘A champion of the forgotten men and women of the Desert Storm era’, may be the badge of honour she cherished the most.

Before she brought the plight of the Iraq War era soldier to the masses, Joyce became a whistle-blower, involved in exposing nursing malpractice issues. Until her health would no longer permit, she was an expert witness for both plaintiff and defence medical cases. Her courage, and determination to stand for the truth, made Joyce the target of harsh scrutiny, and vilification by those willing to value reputation above the lives of helpless infants. She also presented at the National Institutes of Health, and many legal conferences, including the American Trial Lawyers Association.

Her expertise and critical voice lead her to the radio and well over 1500 radio guest appearances. From 1996-1999 with her husband Dave von Kleist, she travelled the country as an advocate for the American Gulf War Veterans Association, with crucial information for veterans throughout the nation. In the Spring of 2000, The Power Hour Radio Show joined the GCN network. With her exuberant husband by her side, Joyce laid the path for the modern independent media movement. The Power Hour became synonymous with blowing the lid off our less than honest ‘reality’. With the tenacity of a bulldog, a unique wit, and a distinctive midwestern charm Joyce endeared herself to a massive audience. The advent and success of the truth media can be traced directly to The Power Hour and the nation of People who called it home. Her pursuit of natural treatments for her cancer diagnosis will long be admired and used in coming generations.

It was by pure luck that I first heard the voice of Joyce Riley, who would set me on course to transform my life, and I believe, to save my life, thanks to an interview I heard in December 2005. While I helped a friend to find information about a food supplement called Serrapeptase, I found a clip, from The Power Hour, in which Joyce interviewed Robert Redfern, the author of a book with a title so long that I only remembered about half of it at the time. Thankfully, the discussion was much more memorable, as was the content of the book. It was more than enough to grab my attention and convince me that I wanted to learn more and that Serrapeptase could be a safe alternative to the prescribed anti-inflammatory painkillers I had taken for years, with little and reducing benefit.

On January 3, 2006, my friend returned with a copy of Robert’s book, and a bottle of Serrapeptase, which was described in the book as, ‘the second gift from silkworms’. It was on that day that My Serrapeptase Adventure started. Within days my health improved, within weeks my health was transformed, and my life was returned to my control.

Since my adventure began in January 2006, interest from around the world continued to grow. The first hint of worldwide media coverage came on February 22nd, 2006. When Robert Redfern of Naturally Healthy Publications, appeared on The Power Hour, he was taking his regular part in a phone-in. A caller rang in asking for information about natural health products, which would be useful for a child with Cerebral Palsy. It was still in its early stages, but Robert gave a brief outline of my story so far.

On April 11th, (2006) I had the pleasure of speaking with Joyce for the first time. She invited me to appear on the following days show.

My Serrapeptase Adventure charts the four life-changing years in which I learnt that many of the symptoms from which Serrapeptase has rescued me were, in fact, known, and even expected, side effects of the toxic cocktail of prescription medications, which I took before I knew about Serrapeptase.

When I first heard people describing my return to naturally sustained good health and then Serrapeptase itself, as a ‘miracle’, I was concerned. At the time, in the summer of 2006, it was not at all certain to me that my improving health would be sustainable. I was thrilled that other people, including Joyce, were so confident, but it took me some time to begin to agree with them.

I am convinced that it is prescription medication, and the global systems designed to reinforce our dependence upon it, that should be called ‘alternative medicine’. If good health is our natural, balanced state, then the goal of health-care should be to maintain that balance or to return us to it, as naturally as possible. This approach still allows for medical and surgical treatments, when they are necessary, but they should be considered useful alternatives, and not assumed to be the only acceptable options.

To be clear, I still have cerebral palsy. Serrapeptase has not removed or cured the condition, but it has improved my health to such an extent that I have returned to the cerebral palsy of my childhood. It was then, and is now, a daily challenge to be managed and overcome. Cerebral palsy is no longer the condition, dominating my life, which it had become. Most importantly, I remain free of the toxic cocktail of prescription medication, which I believe damaged my health and quality of life, far more than cerebral palsy ever has done, or is ever likely to do.

From its very earliest days, My Serrapeptase Adventure has been as much about the kindness and inspiration of people from around the world, as it has been about my continuing search for good health. Joyce was a constant source of information, encouragement, and inspiration, which gave me the information I needed, and the confidence to try Serrapeptase for the first time, long before my eyesight was good enough to read the information for myself.

It is for this reason that I am in no doubt that without The Power Hour, my life would have been very different, and I may not have survived at all. Regular readers and listeners to the show will often have heard me taking every opportunity I get to thank Joyce and the team for their continued support.

Joyce was happy to tell my story and to give me a chance to share it, as often as possible. However, she often downplayed her part in it. In November 2008, Joyce agreed to record her personal view of My Serrapeptase Adventure, and of her contribution to it. As always, she emphasised, which she took from me. In a rare moment, Joyce also described the personal gift she considered it was, to have the opportunity to speak to, learn from, and inspire people around the world.

It is my privilege to have known Joyce and to have been inspired, not only by her knowledge but also by her friendship. Joyce will be deeply missed She is survived by an adoring body of listeners and advocates who have found the world a better place by having Joyce in it. Ever-private with so much personal information, it is proper now to note she has one brother and one son from an early marriage remaining.

The last word should be left to Joyce. It is my privilege to invite you to listen to her thoughts about my story, and the joy, and the challenge of The Power Hour — a radio show, with a worldwide audience, and a gentle touch of personal inspiration.

Never ever stand down if you know that something is going wrong. If you know there’s an injustice, speak out, regardless, because you don’t want to live the rest of your life knowing, ‘I could have done more’.

Joyce Riley, 1948 – 2017

Thanks to The Power Hour, and the Genesis Communications Network, and Naturally Healthy Publications for additional information.

Training The Immune System To Fight Cancer Has 19th-Century Roots

A novel immunotherapy drug is credited for successfully treating former President Jimmy Carter’s advanced melanoma. Instead of killing cancer cells, these drugs boost the patient’s immune system, which does the job instead.

Immunotherapy is cutting-edge cancer treatment, but the idea dates back more than 100 years, to a young surgeon who was willing to think outside the box.

His name was William Coley, and in the late summer of 1890 he was getting ready to examine a new patient at his practice in New York City. What he didn’t know was that the young woman waiting to see him would change his life and the future of cancer research.

Her name was Elizabeth Dashiell, also known as Bessie, says Dr. David Levine, director of archives at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. Bessie was 17 and showed up complaining of a problem with her hand. It seemed like a minor injury, just a small bump where she’d hurt it, but it wasn’t getting better, and she was in a lot of pain. She’d seen other doctors but nobody could diagnose the problem.

At first Coley thought Bessie must have an infection. But when he took a biopsy, it turned out to be a malignant, very advanced cancer called a sarcoma.

In those days there wasn’t very much anyone could do for Bessie. This was before radiation and chemotherapy, so Coley did the only thing he could — he amputated Bessie’s right arm just below the elbow in an attempt to stop the disease from spreading. Sadly, it didn’t work, and within a month, according to David Levine, the cancer had spread “to her lungs, to her liver and all over her body.”

Bessie’s final days were wrenching and painful. Coley was with her when she died on Jan. 23, 1891. Bessie’s death made a huge impression on the young surgeon. “It really shocked him,” says Stephen Hall, who wrote about Coley in his book, A Commotion in the Blood: Life, Death and the Immune System.

Bessie’s death also spurred Coley into action. There wasn’t a lot known about cancer at the time, so Coley started digging through dozens upon dozens of old records at New York Hospital. He was looking for something that would help him understand this cruel and aggressive disease.

As a student, Coley had read Charles Darwin, and one of the lessons he took away from Darwin, Hall says, was to always pay attention when there’s a biological exception to the rule. “To ask yourself: Why this has happened?”

Coley discovered one of these biological exceptions. It was the case of a German immigrant named Fred Stein. Stein had been a patient in New York Hospital eight years earlier. He had a tumor on his neck that doctors tried to remove several times. Unfortunately for Stein, the tumor kept coming back and doctors expected him to die from the disease.

Then Stein contracted a serious infection of the skin caused by the strep bacteria. “It looked like Stein’s days were numbered,” Levine says. But Stein didn’t die. In fact, his tumor disappeared, and he was discharged. Coley wondered if all these years later, Stein could still be alive.

So in the winter of 1891, William Coley the surgeon became William Coley the detective. He headed for the tenements of the Lower East Side of Manhattan where the German immigrant community lived. He knocked on door after door asking for a man named Fred Stein who had a distinctive scar across his neck. After several weeks of searching, Coley found him alive and cancer-free.

So why did Stein’s cancer go away and stay away after he got a bacterial infection? Coley speculated that the strep infection had reversed the cancer. and wondered what would happen if he tried to reproduce the effect by deliberately injecting cancer patients with bacteria.

He decided to test his idea on people who were the most seriously ill. His first subject was an Italian immigrant named Zola who, just like Bessie Dashiell, was suffering from sarcoma. Zola had tumors riddling his throat. He was so sick he could barely eat or speak or even breathe. For months Coley would try to make Zola sick from infection by creating little cuts and rubbing the strep bacteria into them, Hall says. There would be “a slight response but not too much.”

Then Coley got his hands on a much stronger strain of the bacteria. This time, Zola became violently ill with an infection that could easily have killed him. But within 24 hours, Zola’s orange-sized tumor began to liquefy and disintegrate. “This was a phenomenon that occurred rarely, but when you saw it you were utterly astonished,” Hall says.

Zola completely recovered. Coley knew he was on to something. He kept experimenting and refining his use of bacteria. Eventually, he named the treatment Coley’s toxins.

It was an exciting time. Coley was having tremendous success and his efforts were celebrated in America and abroad. But Bradley Coley Jr., William Coley’s grandson, says the American medical establishment at the time was skeptical. Nobody knew how Coley’s toxins worked, or why they worked sometimes and not others. Not even Coley could explain it.

That’s largely because the immune system was still a mystery and would remain so for decades to come.

When radiation therapy came along in the early 1900s, interest in Coley’s toxins was completely overshadowed by this new therapy. When his grandfather died, Bradley Coley says, “All interest in [Coley’s toxins] stopped.”

And quite possibly, that’s where Coley’s legacy would have ended except for this: After Coley’s death in 1936, his daughter, Helen Coley Nauts, started looking through her father’s papers while doing research for his biography. She found about 1,000 files of patients her father had treated with Coley’s toxins.

She spent years carefully analyzing these cases and could see that he had extraordinary rates of success in regressing some cancerous tumors. She couldn’t get anyone interested in studying her father’s work, so she decided to do it herself. With a small grant, in 1953 Helen Coley Nauts started the Cancer Research Institute, dedicated to understanding the immune system and its relationship to cancer.

NPR

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Vaccines, Depression And Neurodegeneration – Dr Russell Blaylock On The Gary Null Show

Dr Russell Blaylock talks with Gary Null about Vaccinations and inflammation and Dr Blaylock’s article titled: Vaccines, Depression and Neurodegeneration After Age 50.

There is a compelling amount of scientific research showing that over-vaccinating especially the elderly and infants is destructive to the brain due to overstimulating the immune system and also due to vaccine ingredients which aggravate the immune system.

It is known that as we get older the immune system begins to overactivate. Pro inflammatory cytokines which cause brain destruction begin to rise over the age of 50. Ages 75-80 they really peak at even higher levels. This is the reason why there are much more cases of diseases among the elderly such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, joint problems, allergic reactions, auto-immune disorders as well as neurodegenerative diseases such as alzheimers and parkinson’s disease.

Chronic inflammation causes an activation of the brain’s special immune system which communicates with the body’s immune system. The brain’s immune system is regulated by microglia cells. These cells are normally in a resting state, but once they become activated they become destructive and secrete inflammatory cytokines and excitotoxins such as glutamate and quinolinic acid. Vaccinations can cause this process to happen, especially among the elderly and young children whose immune system’s are very delicate.

This same process can cause depression. There is a very strong scientific explanation as to why overstimulating the immune system can cause depression. When the microglia is activated, it triggers the secretion of glutamate. Research has shown that major depression is strongly correlated to glutamate levels in the brain. The higher the glutamate the worse the depression.

Why Not Vaccinating My Kids Was The Best Decision I Ever Made

When I first became a Mum, I never questioned getting my children vaccinated. It was just what you did when you have children – you do what your doctor tells you, because they know best.

My husband and I had never been told that there could be any adverse reactions, only a bit of redness and swelling at the injection site. So as each of our six eldest children got progressively sicker after each vaccination, we never made that connection.

Out of our six vaccinated children, our 16, 12 and 10-year-old have moderate to severe Autism, our 25-year-old has ADHD, our 14-year-old has a severe language disorder, and our 20-year-old has severe mood swings. They also suffered from chronic ear infections, bronchiolitis, asthma, eczema, psoriasis, urinary infections, gastrointestinal and autoimmune disorders, allergies, chemical sensitivities and intolerances.

This realization led us to not vaccinate our five and eight-year-old old and they have thrived because of it. Out of all their siblings they should have been the most susceptible to genetic problems considering that I was in my late thirties when I had them and was overweight. Yet our two youngest never had to suffer through the many illnesses that their brothers and sisters did.

Not because they had never been exposed to illness because like all preschool and school children, they had been. But they had a resilience that had been taken from their siblings. They have never had or needed an antibiotic in their lives, but more importantly they had none of their sibling’s disorders.

TalkNetwork

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Mike Adams: The Health Ranger Reveals The World’s Most Powerful Anti-Cancer Foods

Did you know that thousands of different foods, superfoods and spices naturally contain powerful anti-cancer nutrients? You can find hundreds of them right now at your local grocery store (but only if you know what to look for).

While the FDA ridiculously insists that foods can’t prevent or treat any disease, the real truth is that Mother Nature’s vast assortment of plants have been synthesizing anti-cancer nutrients for literally millions of years before the FDA and its corrupt regime even came into existence. Fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, spices and herbs offer a wealth of anti-cancer medicines created by Mother Nature. You can find them in foods like celery, blueberries, red grapes, lemons, broccoli, kale, cabbage, strawberries and much more.

In this podcast, I cover some of the most powerful anti-cancer nutrients found in fresh fruits, vegetables, beverages and superfoods, giving you specific examples of anti-cancer nutrients and foods that can be used safely and affordable to prevent cancer and maintain good health.

Mike Adams: The Health Ranger
Natural News

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Dr Joseph Mercola Interviews Dr David Perlmutter: Alzheimer’s Is Directly Related To Elevated Blood Sugar Levels


grainbrainInsulin resistance also raises your risk for heart disease, so it’s not surprising to find that heart disease is associated with Alzheimer’s as well.

Arterial stiffness (atherosclerosis) is associated with a hallmark process of Alzheimer’s, namely the build-up of beta-amyloid plaque in your brain. According to researcher Timothy Hughes, “the process of vascular ageing may predispose the brain to increased amyloid plaque build-up.”

Recent research also points out that heart disease increases your odds of developing Alzheimer’s — in fact, these two diseases share a number of risk factors.

According to a study published in the journal Radiology, shared risk factors include smoking, alcohol use, diabetes, high fasting blood sugar levels, and obesity.

These kinds of findings dovetail with the conclusions reached by neurologist Dr David Perlmutter, author of the two books: Grain Brain, and Brain Maker.

From his research, Dr Perlmutter has concluded that Alzheimer’s disease is primarily predicated on lifestyle choices and, in a nutshell, anything that promotes insulin resistance will ultimately also raise your risk of Alzheimer’s.

Dr Marcela has written a fascinating, well referenced article, to accompany this interview. I would also recommend reading Dr Perlmutter’s book Grain Brain.

Note: The audio quality of this interview fluctuates slightly, but it well worth persisting to the end.

Mandatory Vaccination: You’re Right To Worry — Dr Sherri Tenpenny


Dr Sherri Tenpenny talks to Lew Rockwell about the true horror of mandatory vaccination. The discussion is wide-ranging, and includes one of the clearest explanations of the significance of the work of Dr Andrew Wakefield.

Dr Tenpenny points out that Dr Wakefield actually recommended that further study was required. He did not, at any point in his paper, suggest a causal ink between vaccines and autism. The observation he made, was based upon a group of children, who had developed gastrointestinal symptoms, following vaccination, which could be proven by biopsy. Parents had also reported to him that the children had regressed, to various degrees, along the autism spectrum, after vaccination.

The scientific heresy, for which a medical, and scientific reputation was destroyed, is to have the audacity to suggest that scientists should do more research, without saying, at any time, what the outcome of such research should be.

For more information on Dr Wakefield’s work, in his own words, see: Interview With Dr Andrew Wakefield, By Mike Adams.

Thanks to Dr Sherri Tenpenny, and The Lew Rockwell Show.