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The Content Was Refreshed: 24 Feb 2018 | 03:52:55

WorldHealthNews Live

Teva Pharmaceuticals announced it would sell a “lower-cost” alternative to Syprine, an old drug that costs more than $21,000. But the new generic version costs nearly as much.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
As the opioid crisis tightens its grip, an industry has sprung up to offer recovery programs for executives who seek treatment in a discreet environment.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
Dozens of countries have tried to address shortages for transplants with an “opt out” system that assumes consent.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
Cross-country skiers require, on average, more daily calories than any other type of athlete. But the constant need to eat can take over their lives.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
“I’m hearing more and more people say the level of violence on video games is really shaping young people’s thoughts,” the president said on Thursday.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
Spree killers may be angry and troubled, but few have shown symptoms that would have landed them in mental hospitals.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:18 am
Outbreaks across the continent infected 21,000 and killed at least 35 children, leading some governments to crack down on vaccine compliance.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:15 am
A reader asks: Can you get sick just from sitting in an overly air-conditioned room or going out without a jacket? Or do you need to actually catch a virus?
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 24, 2018, 12:15 am

From inappropriate air kisses to one-sided conversations, our awkward moments remind us how much we have in common

In the late 1960s, the anthropologist Edmund Carpenter arrived in New Guinea armed with mirrors, video and Polaroid cameras, and a mission: to blow the minds of members of the Biami tribe, who had never seen full reflections or images of themselves. “They were paralysed,” he wrote later. “After their first startled response – covering their mouths and ducking their heads – they stood transfixed, staring at their images.” Like any of us, the Biami carried an inner image of themselves, but unlike us, it was formed without mirrors or photos. Carpenter’s devices disrupted that inner image, triggering discomfort. But not for long. Within days, “they groomed themselves openly before mirrors… In an astonishingly short time, these villagers… were making movies [and] taking Polaroid shots of each other.” If they weren’t technically posing for selfies all day, as I’m told the young people do in 2018, it was only through lack of the right gadgets.

As Melissa Dahl points out in her brilliant new book Cringeworthy: A Theory of Awkwardness, just published in the US, it’s unclear if the Biami were really as unfamiliar with mirrors as Carpenter thought. But in any case, what’s striking isn’t how strange their reaction seems, but how relatable. You know how it feels when you make an amiable remark in a lift, but nobody responds? (I hope so. Otherwise it’s just me.) Or when two people greeting each other misjudge whether to go for a handshake, hug or social kiss? That’s the same awkwardness: “self-consciousness tinged with uncertainty,” as Dahl defines it. It’s “the feeling we get when someone’s presentation of themselves… is shown to be incompatible with reality in a way that can’t be smoothed over.”

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Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
The risk of an early death from any cause surges 30% for those diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at 49 but the risk of death linked to cardiovascular disease is 60%
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm

I was expected to remain a virgin until I married a boy from church. At 23, I have rejected this lifestyle, but my attempts to meet a potential partner have failed

I am a 23-year-old woman who is having trouble navigating the secular dating world. I grew up in a religious family where the expectation was that I would marry a boy from church, in a no-sex-before-marriage setup. This was complicated by my not liking any of the few guys on offer – and by my occasional attraction to women. The upshot is that I have never been on a date, not even a Christian one. Since leaving religion recently, I have been attracted to and tried to show interest in some guys, but it has not been reciprocated. I am worried that my nerves are showing. My atheism has created conflict with my parents, which I know will worsen if I date a non-Christian. My mother is obsessed with me remaining a virgin. I think I have complexes about sex myself. I am starting to despair. Any advice?

•When leaving a message on this page, please be sensitive to the fact that you are responding to a real person in the grip of a real-life dilemma, who wrote to Private Lives asking for help, and may well view your comments here. Please consider especially how your words or the tone of your message could be perceived by someone in this situation, and be aware that comments that appear to be disruptive or disrespectful to the individual concerned will be removed.

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Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Biomedical scientist Dr Lanyon reveals the popular cleaning product we could all live without
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
When editor Gary Jones fell ill after a holiday in Spain it led to a shock diagnosis and emergency surgery to remove cancer. He tells the Mirror about his ordeal.
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
One in eight men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime so it's important to know the facts
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Umbilicoplasty is on the rise, and patients are requesting their belly buttons be shaped like certain celebrities'
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Habitually drinking acidic drinks such as fruit teas or lemon and water, as well as changing patterns of eating will increase the risks of tooth erosion, scientists have found
Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Older Bodies Younger Brains

Elite elders are more than just an oddity. There's potential for learning an enormous amount and applying it to the rest of us, including those who may be on a trajectory for some type of neurodegenerative disease, researchers say.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Samuel Archibald

After being denied coverage for his depression, Samuel Archibald received a call from UQAM's group insurance company, Desjardins, on Thursday morning informing him that they had reviewed his file and accepted his claim.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
doctor writing prescriptions

Canada's appalling record on Indigenous health is undermining its efforts to be a global health leader, according to the Lancet, a medical journal.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
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There’s public science in every single new drug. That was the surprising answer to a U.S. senator’s question about how government-funded research is benefitting citizens. But it took a year to come up with the numbers.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
Yusuf smiling

A Syrian refugee family that travelled for years through refugee camps in Lebanon and Turkey before arriving in Leamington, Ont. is searching for answers after their five-year-old son died following a routine procedure at Windsor Regional Hospital.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
USA-HEALTHCARE/

A CBC News analysis has found Nova Scotia doctors are leaving for other provinces at an accelerating pace, and stemming the outflow could cost tens of millions in salary increases.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm

Like many young people, Ella Coulter started drinking when she was at school. But after hitting rock bottom last year, the 29-year-old is now sober for the first time in 15 years.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm

I knew living in India would be difficult — it has one of the world's highest road tolls, and Delhi is notorious for sexual violence against women — but I had no idea the most hostile thing I would encounter would be the air I breathe every day, writes Siobhan Heanue.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm

Doctors fear a rising trend in elder abuse could combine with proposed voluntary euthanasia laws to create a dangerous environment for elderly people to be exploited.

Author: WorldHealthNews Live
Posted: February 23, 2018, 11:57 pm
The Content Was Refreshed: 24 Feb 2018 | 03:52:55