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REFRESHED: August 18, 2017 | 23:03:50

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And telescopes and binoculars only amplify the risk to your eyes from looking at the sun, doctors say. So even if you're not in the "path of totality," take precautions if you plan to watch.
Left: A partial solar eclipse, as viewed from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, March 2015. Right: A total solar eclipse, as viewed from Longyearbyen, Norway, March 2015.

And telescopes and binoculars only amplify the risk to your eyes from looking at the sun, doctors say. So even if you're not in the "path of totality," take precautions if you plan to watch.

(Image credit: Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images)

Author: Nell Greenfieldboyce
Posted: 18-08-2017
Many images that have been traditionally used to depict the Black Death are, in fact, not images of the plague at all. Now, a group of dedicated historians are trying to correct the record.
Strike 2: Our second attempt at illustrating the plague story — with what we said was a 15th-century image by Jacopo Oddi from the La Franceschina codex depicting Franciscan monks treating victims of the plague in Italy — also turned out be a picture of people with leprosy.

Many images that have been traditionally used to depict the Black Death are, in fact, not images of the plague at all. Now, a group of dedicated historians are trying to correct the record.

(Image credit: A. Dagli Orti/Getty Images)

Author: Rae Ellen Bichell
Posted: 18-08-2017
NPR gets exclusive access to a lab in Portland, Ore., where scientists have begun editing the DNA in human embryos to try to prevent genetic diseases.
This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy.

NPR gets exclusive access to a lab in Portland, Ore., where scientists have begun editing the DNA in human embryos to try to prevent genetic diseases.

(Image credit: OHSU)

Author: Rob Stein
Posted: 18-08-2017
Idalia Amaya, an emergency response coordinator for Catholic Relief Services, says the top priority is rescuing people trapped in their homes under the mud.
Search and rescue team members and soldiers work near a mudslide site and a damaged building near Freetown, Sierra Leone, on Tuesday.

Idalia Amaya, an emergency response coordinator for Catholic Relief Services, says the top priority is rescuing people trapped in their homes under the mud.

(Image credit: Mohamed Saidu Bah /AFP/Getty Images)

Author: Tom Murphy
Posted: 17-08-2017
A nationwide survey shows that postpartum nurses often fail to warn mothers about potentially life-threatening complications following childbirth, mainly because they need more education themselves.
The maternal mortality rate in the U.S. is the highest among affluent nations. Researchers believe that with better education, postpartum nurses could help mothers identify life-threatening complications.

A nationwide survey shows that postpartum nurses often fail to warn mothers about potentially life-threatening complications following childbirth, mainly because they need more education themselves.

(Image credit: Mart Klein/Getty Images)

Author: Nina Martin, ProPublica
Posted: 17-08-2017
It reversed earlier injunctions that forbade the state from suspending payments to the medical provider over a controversial leaked video of Planned Parenthood staff.
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, pictured here during an interview last month, ended the state

It reversed earlier injunctions that forbade the state from suspending payments to the medical provider over a controversial leaked video of Planned Parenthood staff.

(Image credit: Stephan Savoia/AP)

Author: Merrit Kennedy
Posted: 16-08-2017
Each year more than 600,000 babies die of sepsis. Researchers have found a simple way to prevent it: Feed babies probiotic bacteria that are common in kimchi, pickles and other fermented vegetables.
Matt Twombly for NPR

Each year more than 600,000 babies die of sepsis. Researchers have found a simple way to prevent it: Feed babies probiotic bacteria that are common in kimchi, pickles and other fermented vegetables.

(Image credit: Matt Twombly for NPR)

Author: Michaeleen Doucleff
Posted: 16-08-2017
Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking.
Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here

Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking.

(Image credit: Ann Boyajian/Getty Images/Illustration Works)

Author: Allison Aubrey
Posted: 16-08-2017
When leaders in Washington discuss the future of American health care, women are not always in the room. Here, eight women from around the country share their personal stories, fears and hopes.
U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and other female senators were excluded from the Senate leadership health task force this summer.

When leaders in Washington discuss the future of American health care, women are not always in the room. Here, eight women from around the country share their personal stories, fears and hopes.

(Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Author: Jenny Gold
Posted: 16-08-2017
Medical professionals take pride in their commitment to care for all patients. But that pride doesn't shield them from the difficult ones.
While doctors and nurses have an ethical duty to treat all patients, they are not immune to feelings of dread when it comes to patients who are hateful or belligerent. A well-known article from the 1970s spoke to this.

Medical professionals take pride in their commitment to care for all patients. But that pride doesn't shield them from the difficult ones.

(Image credit: Sally Elford/Getty Images)

Author: John Henning Schumann
Posted: 16-08-2017
In Zambia, some people were so hungry that they risked their health to eat hippo meat infected with anthrax. Researchers say it reveals how food insecurity can spread disease.
A hippo walks through the South Luangwa National Park in eastern Zambia, where an anthrax outbreak occurred in 2011.

In Zambia, some people were so hungry that they risked their health to eat hippo meat infected with anthrax. Researchers say it reveals how food insecurity can spread disease.

(Image credit: Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Author: Jason Beaubien
Posted: 16-08-2017
A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring.
A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring.

A growing number of food videos aim to trigger ASMR — Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response, or pleasing sensations in the brains of some viewers — by focusing on sounds like chopping and stirring.

(Image credit: Christina Lee for NPR)

Author: Clare Leschin-Hoar
Posted: 16-08-2017
In South Florida, people with health insurance are the target of "body brokers" who can earn lucrative kickbacks — $500 per week — for referring vulnerable patients to centers that bilk insurers.
Dillon Katz, at home in Delray Beach, Fla., says recovering drug users in his group counseling meetings frequently used to offer to help him get into a new treatment facility. He suspects now they were recruiters — so-called "body brokers" — who were receiving illegal kickbacks from the corrupt facility.

In South Florida, people with health insurance are the target of "body brokers" who can earn lucrative kickbacks — $500 per week — for referring vulnerable patients to centers that bilk insurers.

(Image credit: Peter Haden/WLRN)

Author: Peter Haden
Posted: 15-08-2017
The Congressional Budget Office estimates that ending what's known as cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers will raise the deficit $194 billion over 10 years.
An analysis by the Congressional Budget Office released Tuesday found that ending cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers, a move that President Trump is contemplating, would raise the deficit by $194 billion over 10 years.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that ending what's known as cost-sharing reduction payments to insurers will raise the deficit $194 billion over 10 years.

(Image credit: Melina Mara/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

Author: Alison Kodjak
Posted: 15-08-2017
Since Congress hasn't passed a fix, employers who offer generous health care plans may look to shift the tax burden to employees if the so-called "Cadillac tax" kicks in.
People with high-value health plans may not be able to get out of paying the tax bill.

Since Congress hasn't passed a fix, employers who offer generous health care plans may look to shift the tax burden to employees if the so-called "Cadillac tax" kicks in.

(Image credit: Gary Waters/Getty Images/Ikon Images)

Author: Michelle Andrews
Posted: 15-08-2017