Understanding The Phytochemical Power Of Turmeric

Updated: June 13, 2017 | 13:59

Sometimes called Indian saffron, turmeric is an ancient ayurvedic medicine that has been used for centuries throughout Indonesia and Southeast Asia. It is a powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant with a long history of use both medicinally and in cuisine. A perennial plant native to South Asia, turmeric is a member of the ginger family. Some regions use the leaves or eat the root raw, but usually the root is harvested, boiled, then dried in hot ovens and ground into powder. The yellow-orange colored powder is used as a spice, a food additive for coloring, and as a dye. It is the main ingredient in curry powder, an earthy, peppery spice used prevalently in many types of cuisine, from Thai to Indian. Also used by practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), turmeric is a symbol of prosperity and considered to be a cleansing herb for the whole body.

Long used in food for its medicinal value, the main component in turmeric is the phytochemical Curcumin, which is a strong anti-inflammatory that helps fight viral infection, cancer, and arthritis. Its antioxidant properties help to neutralize free radicals, stimulate the gall bladder, and protect the liver. Turmeric has been shown to reduce the cellular inflammation and oxidative stress that causes degenerative disease. It improves blood flow, which improves cognitive function and speeds wound healing.

Researchers are investigating the benefits of turmeric for treating Alzheimer’s, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, HIV, cataracts, gallstones, endometriosis, atherosclerosis, heart attacks, and more. Bach says it has antioxidant properties that inhibit the development of free radicals, and neutralizes existing ones. Some research shows turmeric to have anti-fungal and anti-bacterial compounds as well. It is one of the most-studied herbs today. Turmeric truly is a superfood.

The Phytonutrients In Turmeric

There are more than 90 active constituents found in turmeric, many with overlapping biological activities. Some of them are:

  • Curcuminoids: Natural polyphenols that improve cell communication and reduce prostaglandins and cytokines, thereby reducing inflammation
  • Vitamins: A, C, E, B1, B2, and B3
  • Minerals: Calcium, iron, phosphorous, chromium, manganese, potassium, selenium, zinc
  • Several carotenoids, xanthophylls and carotenes, indicated by bright yellow, orange, and red colors, they either convert to vitamin A (for immunity) as needed by the body, or combat free radicals and prevent heart disease, according to the Mayo Clinic
  • Starch and protein
  • Resin, a fatty substance in the root that is soluble in ether and a glucoside, turpethin reduces pain and inflammation
  • Essential (or volatile) oil with turmerone, zingiberene, and p-tolymehyl
  • COX-2 inhibitors (painkillers) without the body function inhibiting COX-1s found in aspirin and other anti-inflammatory drugs
  • Cineole and other monoterpenes
  • Additional phytochemicals of note: Alpha-pinene, alpha-terpineol, azulene, beta-carotene, borneol, caffeic acid, caryophyllene, cinnamic acid, eugenol, guaicol, limonene, linalool, p-coumaric acid, p-cymene, turmerone, vanillic acid, phellandrene, sabinene, and many more

Each constituent has many health benefits, but they also work synergistically together, making the whole herb more powerful than any singled out ingredient on its own. When using the powder, there is little to no essential oil. This is of note because some researchers believe that some of the health benefits come from the oil. Likewise, Curcumin removed from turmeric may be a more potent antioxidant than turmeric, while giving up some of the other health benefits found in the whole herb.

Actions And Uses Of The Primary Constituents

According to herballegacy.com, the phtyochemical’s health benefits are legion. The cited phytochemical and ethnobotanical database attributes the following biologic activities to the constituents lists above:

Curcumin is the main curcuminoid of turmeric, and responsible for most of its biological activity. Curcuminoids are natural phenols that give turmeric its distinct yellow-orange color. Turmeric contains up to five percent essential (also called volatile) oils and five percent Curcumin. Curcumin, a polyphenol, is a pH indicator turning yellow in acidic solutions and red in alkaline solutions. It is a potent antioxidant that acts as an anti-mutagenic, meaning it stops cells from mutating. It stops toxic compounds from reacting with body tissues. Curcumin is also credited with improving communication between cells. It is being studied as a treatment for Alzheimer’s.

The other two curcuminoids are desmethoxycurcumin and bis-desmethoxycurcumin. Together, these phytochemicals work to counteract the causes of most coronary, chronic, and autoimmune diseases usually set in motion by poor diet choices and other toxins such as pharmaceuticals.

Another phytochemical of note in turmeric is 1,8-cineole. It is an antiseptic and expectorant that eliminates gas and stimulates the central nervous system. This means it aids circulation, improves blood vessel health and elasticity, lowers bad cholesterol, improves physical endurance, and inhibits platelet aggregation.

In addition to all the phytonutrients and phytochemicals present in turmeric, its high ORAC score of almost 160,000 means it also helps boost the body’s own resources, such as the natural antioxidants glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. These substances help the cells function optimally, protecting organs and tissues from oxidation.

Natural News

Read The Full Article

As always, I invite you to read the full article. In this case, this invitation is more than a courtesy. The full article is well referenced.

The Health-Care Survivor’s Comment

Curcumin has been an integral part of My Serrapeptase Adventure, which charts my own escape from the toxic cocktail of prescription medication and return to naturally sustained good health. I have chosen to take Curcumin, rather than turmeric because the active curcuminoids represent a small proportion of the total amount of turmeric. Furthermore, turmeric offers poor levels of bioavailability, unless it is combined with substances, which enable better levels of absorption by the body. It is for this reason that I have chosen to take Curcumin and Serranol, which incorporate Phytosomes.

Phytosomes are plant extracts bound to phosphatidylcholine (fos-fa-tidal-ko-leen), which is an essential component of human cells. Our bodies make phosphatidylcholine, but we can also get it from food and supplements. When taken orally, phosphatidylcholine is very well absorbed. To improve absorption, scientists found a way to attach Curcumin to phosphatidylcholine – the result is Curcumin When you take Curcumin your body readily absorbs the phosphatidylcholine and the Curcumin attached to it, resulting in more Curcumin reaching the cells that can benefit from it.

Thanks to Natural News and Naturally Healthy Publications.

Previous Next

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *